Radio (Times) is a sound salvation, Radio (Times) is cleaning up the nation

30th March 2010 • Blog Post by Seb Patrick •

It seems that if the folk at the Radio Times have their way, we won’t actually need to watch the new series of Doctor Who – they’re happy to do it for us. I blame Alison Graham. Anyway, in a big old exclusive – and one that must surely have the editorial staff of Doctor Who Magazine grumbling into their Coco Pops – not only does the new edition contain the first proper pictures of the TARDIS interior, but also a synopsis AND a dialogue extract for EACH and EVERY episode of Series Fnarg. We’re still missing a few titles, but nevertheless, we’re that bit closer to get a sense of how the series as a whole is going to play out. Obviously these are quite vague, but they do come with strong spoiler warnings as there’s probably a few bits of fun that they could ruin for the more staunch ear-fingerers. Read on after the jump for the content very generously transcribed by Venture South of this parish.

But cor, what about the sound of Simon Nye’s episode, eh?

1. The Eleventh Hour
Writer: Steven Moffat
Guest Starts: Annette Crosbie, Nina Wadia, and Arthur Darvill

Geronimo! A brand-new Doctor crashing to Earth. New face, new body, new man. And he’s barely staggered out of the blue box, before he’s found himself in the middle of the Crisis That Just Won’t Stop! No time to rest and recover, no Tardis, no screwdriver – just six billion human beings about to die and only one man to save them. But the new Doctor encounters more than danger – this is the day he meets Amy Pond. Can he persuade her to trust him, when he’s been letting her down all her life?

“Who da man?”

2. The Beast Below
Writer: Steven Moffat
Guest Stars: Sophie Okonedo, Terrence Hardiman

The Doctor takes Amy to the far future, and Starship UK. The British people, adrift among the stars on a giant spaceship, in search of a new home. But there are secrets here, in the rusting corridors and clanging hallways. A masked figure, who knows the Doctor of old, begs his help, while Amy encounters the terrifying Smilers, and uncovers a secret so dreadful, no one can remember it…

“Nobody talk to me! Nobody human has anything to say to me today!”

3. Victory of the Daleks
Writer: Mark Gatiss
Guest stars: Ian McNeice and Bill Paterson

From the terrifying future of the United Kingdom to one of the darkest chapters of its past – World War Two. The Doctor and Amy find themselves in a top-secret cabinet war room deep beneath the London streets. And there, gliding among the nicotine walls and Bakelite telephones, the Daleks are hatching their deadliest scheme yet. Only one man can help the Doctor – whose side is Winston Churchill on?

“I wanted to know what their plan was. I was their plan!”

4. The Time of Angels
5. Flesh and Stone
Writer: Steven Moffat
Guest Stars: Alex Kingston and Ian Glen

A two-part story. A crashed spaceship, a shattered temple and a terrifying climb through the maze of the dead – River Song is back in the Doctor’s life, and she’s brought more trouble than even he can handle. The last of the Weeping Angels is loose in the ruins of Alfava Metraxis, and the Doctor is recruited to track it down. “Don’t Blink!” everyone tells Amy – but as Amy is about to discover, not blinking, might just be the worst thing you can do…

“Is River Song your wife?”

6. Vampires in Venice
Writer: Toby Whithouse
Guest Star: Helen McCrory

In Venice, even danger is beautiful. The House of Calvierri has the whole city under its protection, but something is very wrong. There are blood-drained corpses in the street, something lurks in the canal, and the Calvierri girls are the loveliest in town, except when you glance in the mirror…

“You know what’s dangerous about you? Not that you ask people to take risks, but that you make them want to impress you!”

7. Amy’s Choice
Writer: Simon Nye
Guest Star: Toby Jones

It’s been five long years since Amy travelled in the Tardis with her mysterious Doctor – and when he shows up again, on the eve of the birth of her first child, danger is not far behind him. Amy is faced with a heartbreaking choice that will change her life forever.

“I know who you are. There’s only one person in the universe who hates me as much as you do.”

Episodes 8 and 9
Writer: Chris Chibnall
Guest Stars: Meera Syal, Stephen Morre and Neve McIntosh
In 2015, the most ambitious drilling project in history is under way. Dr Nasreen Chaudhry and her team have reached 21 kilometres into the Earth’s crust – but something is stirring far below. Amy Pond discovers there’s nowhere to run when you can’t even trust the ground at your feet.

“While you’ve been drilling down… something else has been drilling up.”

Episode 10
Writer: Richard Curtis
Guest Star: Tony Curran

Terror lurks in the cornfields of Provence, but only a sad and lonely painter can see it. Amy Pond finds herself shoulder to shoulder with Vincent van Gogh, in a battle with a deadly alien – saving the world has never been so ginger! But can even the Doctor save Vincent?

“Art can wait, this is life and death. We need to talk to Vincent van Gogh!”

Episode 11
Writer: Gareth Roberts
Guest Stars: James Corden and Daisy Haggard

The Doctor faces his greatest challenge yet – a flat share! People are disappearing on Aickman Road, and the Doctor must solve the mystery of a staircase that people walk up – but never down.

“All I have to do is pass as an ordinary human being. What could possibly go wrong?”

Episode 12 and 13
Writer: Steven Moffat

A message on the oldest cliff-face in the universe, a puzzle box opening from the inside and a love that lasts thousands of years…The fates are drawing close around the Tardis – is this the day the Doctor falls?

“There was a goblin. Or a trickster, or a warrior. A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. Nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it – one day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.”

Wallop, eh?

Seb Patrick once met Paul McGann, who immediately pretended to be Mark McGann. He writes for Den of Geek, BBC America, Film4 and the official Red Dwarf website, among others. He owns over thirty toy Daleks and wishes the Dapol factory tour was still open.

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8 Responses

  1. VS

    The idea in Roberts episode of the ‘the mystery of a staircase’ strikes me as another great example of playing on Childhoood fears that Moffat has been so good at.

  2. Hendiadys

    http://blogtorwho.blogspot.com/ have furnished the internet with some scans, by the way. From the Radio Times and other, somewhat shitter magazines.

    I’ll say this: the (admittedly elusive) summaries for these stories make me think this series is going to be great. Just reading those summaries – especially those for the Moffat stories – gets the hairs on the back of my neck on end.

    Look at that summary for episodes 12 and 13. This isn’t RTD, that’s for sure. I sense a distinctly Borgesian approach underlying this series – a logic of paradoxes that in this universe become real, tangible and terrifying. “A puzzle box opening from the inside” – what a brilliantly obscure threat. With a lesser writer I wouldn’t feel so sure, but to me “the oldest cliff-face in the universe” is a recipe for an incredible atmosphere and a mysterious, lonely story. Imagine the Doctor and Amy discovering a message on it.

    I know – too much optimism. But I have to say I’ve not bought any of the New Series on DVD so far (I have no intention of buying any RTD Who), and I’m already thinking this might end up being the first. I’ll let you know if I change my mind.

  3. VS

    >With a lesser writer I wouldn’t feel so sure, but to me “the oldest cliff-face in the universe” is a recipe for an incredible atmosphere and a mysterious, lonely story.

    I have to admit that whenever I read that I just end up thinking of the bit in Norway in ‘Restaurant at the End of the Universe’

  4. Andy M

    The first thing that came into my mind was God’s Final Message To His Creation.

  5. Jonathan Capps

    This isn’t RTD, that’s for sure. I sense a distinctly Borgesian approach underlying this series – a logic of paradoxes that in this universe become real, tangible and terrifying.

    Matt Smith keeps mentioning how tied together this whole series is, and hints that there’s a great deal of messing about with time. We’ve reached a point where this sort of this looks like it’ll be the focus of the whole show, rather than a trademark of the Moffat episode.

  6. Hendiadys

    I have to admit that whenever I read that I just end up thinking of the bit in Norway in ‘Restaurant at the End of the Universe’

    That’s fair, given the phrasing! But there’s something intrinsically bleak for me about cliff-faces and the way that oceans smash against them for century upon century, regardless of day or night or there being any life on the planet at all.

    I know it’s all conjecture at the moment, and I know it’s boring to read other people’s conjecture, but I’m feeling comfortable that this finale will be quite a departure from RTD’s increasing bombast. That’s all I wanted to say, really.

  7. si

    See, VS, URP know how to reproduce an RT article without glaring omissions like ‘r’s and 7’s.

  8. si

    Apparently, Episode 11 is based on the strip from DWM a few issues back, where the Doctor shared with Mickey.

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